Whole Brain Development

THE SCIENCE OF EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Family PlayingThe concept of Whole Brain Development has been around for a while. It’s intuitive to believe that tapping into all the power the human brain has to offer is the best approach to early child development.

What’s new, and why there has never been more momentum behind this philosophy, is the growing understanding of how neural networks form. Multiple exposures to a specific stimulus is required to adequately establish a neural network, which is why an informed, consistent approach to interacting with a child must be executed. Additionally, for Whole Brain Development to occur, there must also be exposure to many different types of stimulus, again, multiple times, so that all neural networks are fully developed.

More simply put, think of neural networks as “hooks.” As new information is received, the brain automatically attaches it to an existing hook (related prior knowledge).  The process of learning something new and attaching it to an existing hook enables the brain to hold onto and retain more information. The ability to process and retain more information compounds over time creating a fully enriched brain, loaded with neural networks.  

And with the ability to hook all forms of information, both logic and creative based, comprehensive understanding becomes more natural, making it  easier for a child to master more complex tasks.

With this, comes increased confidence in the ability to figure things out, creating self esteem, and that self esteem gives children the permission to tackle even more challenging tasks without fear of failure – in school and otherwise.

On the contrary, failure on one kind of task due to lack of development in that specific area breeds doubt and can negatively affect self esteem.

Our holistic approach to teaching parents the techniques that lead to Whole Brain Development is what makes our program so successful.

 

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Hearing the process explained by professionals bolsters my resolve in communicating and promoting neural growth.”

– Garrett, Simply Smart Parent

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